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Oberhasli does reach
Triple Crown status


New breed club offers awards at ADGA convention

Staff_Report

A new breed club, The United Oberhasli Breeders (UOB), made a positive entrance into the breed club world at the 2004 ADGA convention in Albuquerque, New Mexico last October, by presenting Triple Crown Performance awards to LuAnn Tuttle (Tutelu) and David Moore (Vassajara), Oberhasli breeders.

"Both David and LuAnn have does that achieved admirable status by accomplishing excellence in three key areas; the show ring (permanent champion status), milk production (Top 10 Milker), and Linear Appraisal (90+ scores)," said Chris Alexander, Columbia, Maine, UOB spokesperson. "It was with great pleasure that the UOB was able to recognize these breeders and their impressive goats! Congratulations again to both LuAnn and David!"

Tutlelu Nadia, a 3-yr.-old Oberhasli doe owned by LuAnn Tuttle, Utah, was a GCH, linear appraised 90 VEEE, and was also a Top Ten milker-#5 production 3,140 lbs., #3 protein 96 lbs./3.1%, and #8 butterfat 118 lbs./3.8%. She placed 8th in her class at the 2003 ADGA National Show in Iowa.

Redwood Hills Finnegan Ginger, five-year-old Oberhasli doe, owned by David Moore, California, is a GCH, linear appraised at 90 EEEE, and earned Top Ten distinctions at #9 in milk 2,960 lbs., and # 9 in protein 88 lbs., 3.0%.

Vassajara’s Vada, four-year-old Oberhasli doe, breed and owned by David Moore, California, GCH, linear appraised 91 EEEE, and was #6 ADGA Top Ten milk production with 3,100 lbs., #7 butterfat 121 lbs./3.9%, #5 protein 91/2.5%.

The United Oberhasli Breeders presented these awards as a way to educate others about this breed. Their goal is to facilitate people wanting to discuss the enjoyment of having Oberhasli dairy goats as well as education. Their club statement includes the following information:

Preface: "The ‘Law of the Farm’ teaches that a successful harvest must be preceded by timely planting and on-going care (watering, weeding, etc.). A similar principle applies in developing an organization. Things we value take time and nourishment. If we neglect them now, we can’t expect positive results later." To that end, United Oberhasli Breeders should consider a mission and a vision.

Mission: The Organization shall have for its objective the fostering of enthusiasm for being breeders of Oberhasli through exhibiting, performance, and education accomplished by a strong cooperative effort that brings members together in order to continue to develop the breed.

Vision: Our vision is a united organization that spans the interests and activities of all who participate. We welcome all walks of life and envision a membership as diverse as the activities they are engaged in. With support and education offered to all in their equally worthy endeavors, we strive for advancement of the Oberhasli dairy goat.

There are approximately 63 UOB members at this time. They sponsored classes at the 2004 ADGA National Show in PA in memory of Oberhasli breeder Margaret Lashua and presented table there with a focus on the celebration of the 25-year Anniversary for Oberhasli in ADGA. They also had a display table at fall 2004 ADGA Convention in New Mexico.

Club members are working on a project to identify where in the United States there are very few or not any Oberhasli, and the hope to work with breeders in the surrounding areas to see if Oberhasli breeders can be encouraged in those locations.

Sandy Van Echo, AR, also a spokesperson for the UOB said ideas for club for 2005 included working on creating and distributing an educational packet on Dairy Goats and what dairy products they produce, with the Oberhasli being the featured goat. This would be designed so that a 12-year-old child could present the information to his or her class or 4-H group.





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